Ep 1.6 – Wall Street Slave Market – Step 6 of the Old New York & New Amsterdam Series

This is the sixth and final step in the series. Today we are going to arrive at the edge of New Amsterdam on Wall Street. We will discover what happened to the wall that once stood here, as well as talk about what this street was famous for in the 1700s, though it wasn’t yet finance (we’ll save that for another day), but one of the great evils of history: slavery.

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LISTEN:

Come join us through the iTunes podcast app (click here! or just search for “city between”) and at Google Play here (you’ll need to sign in to your gmail account) and Stitcher here.. Remember there are three ways you can enjoy City Between:

1. Just listen as you go about your day as you would any other podcast!

2. Armchair tour:

If you are enjoying this podcast from the comfort of your home or office or coffee shop and want to follow along visually, here’s the link to the Google Street View of step 6, the Wall Street Slave Market step of the Old New York & New Amsterdam series (the Slave Market memorial sign had not been erected at the time of this Google photo):

3. Visit and take the steps yourself:

If you are in New York and would like to do these steps on your own this episode’s step and the other ones in this series can serve as an audio guide for you as gift from us. Spend an hour or two roaming the streets of New Amsterdam with us. To follow along first make sure you are moving on from the previous “Hanover Square” step. You will continue northeast along Pearl Street for two more blocks until you come to Wall Street. Make a right and walk one block down hill and cross to the northeast corner of Water and Wall Streets. Here is a handy map of the tour you can use in your smart phone/tablet or print it out as you like:

Photo:

Wall Street Slave Market Sign:

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Further Reading

Read the NYC Parks page on slave market memorial.

As always Gotham by Edwin Burrows and Mike Wallace is indispensable for NYC historians.